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FOR JANUARY 31, 2021

DEUTERONOMY 18:15-20

THE BACKGROUND

The book of Deuteronomy is a collection of Moses’ final instructions. Moses addresses the people of Israel, prior to their entrance into the promised land.  Moses will not follow, but will end his days at Mount Nebo (also called Mount Pisgah).  Earlier in the story, the people were fearful of seeing God’s face or hearing his voice, lest they die.  They asked Moses to be their intermediary.  Moses would receive God’s word, and relay it to the people.  Moses became their first prophet. 

THE DETAIL

  • Moses stated that since they are going their separate ways, God will provide them a replacement prophet; they won’t be left without a spokesperson. This is what they asked for back at Mt. Horeb (Mt. Sinai).  The quote is a paraphrase of Deut. 5:22-27.  (vv. 15-16)
  •  Through Moses, God agrees that they would indeed die, if they heard the voice of the Lord. (v. 17)
  • Then, God lays out how a prophet works.  God speaks to the prophet, and the prophet speaks the words to the people. God will hold the people and the prophet accountable for obeying the Lord’s commandments.  (vv. 18-20)

THE TAKEAWAY

The writers of the gospels in the New Testament, especially Matthew, tell us that Jesus is the new Moses; he is the head of all the prophets.  Jesus not only speaks for God, but he is God Incarnate.  Now, with the gift of the Holy Spirit given to all believers, we can speak with God directly, without the need of a go-between. 

 

1 CORINTHIANS 8

THE BACKGROUND

In first century Palestine, Jews did not eat much meat, except for fish.  It was not an everyday food, because it was very expensive. The exception was the meat sacrificed by the pagans to their gods.  This meat was available and cheap.  The Jews were forbidden from eating this meat.  Paul preached about the freedom of Christians to eat anything; that the Jewish dietary laws were nullified by Jesus life, death and resurrection.  Some of the Christians in Corinth understood Paul’s teaching, took it to heart, and they ate meat.  This caused quite a stir, since this meat had been sacrificed to pagan gods.  Some said it was defiled meat, and should not be consumed.  In today’s second lesson, Paul explains what they should do.

THE DETAIL

  • Paul starts out by saying that while they might have true knowledge, love is better than knowledge.  Love builds up (the body of Christ).  (vv. 1-3)
  • He then says that they are indeed right.  The meat offered to idols is not really defiled, since those idols are fake. There is only one God, and one Lord Jesus Christ.  The rest is nonsense, and they really could eat that meat.  (vv. 4-6)
  • Next comes the “but”.  The community of believers was a mix of Christians who were well-versed in the teachings of Jesus and believers who were recent converts.  The faith and knowledge of the recent converts would have still been shaky.  There would still be some lingering emotional ties to their old pagan beliefs.  Paul calls them “weak believers”.  Paul points out to the “strong believers” that when they eat meat sacrificed to those fake idols, it becomes a stumbling block to the new believers’ faith.  (vv. 7-12a)
  • Anything that we do to cause another’s faith to falter is a “sin against Christ” (v. 12b)
  • Paul’s says that he’d rather be a vegetarian than sin against Christ.

THE TAKEAWAY

What Paul is saying is that yes, as Christians, we are not bound to keep the Kosher laws of the Jewish faith.  We have the freedom to eat whatever we like.  But he tempers this freedom with love and consideration for the community of believers.  Out of love and respect for our brothers and sisters, Paul says that it may be necessary to set aside some of our freedom out of respect for others.  In doing so, the body of Christ becomes stronger. This is a perfect definition of agape* love—the sacrificial love that you give for others.  Let us pray that we can all find it in our hearts to give more of this love to our communities and our churches.

* In the Greek language, there are several words for love.  The Greek word agape means the sort of love that involves the giving of self.  For example, it is the type of love that is involved when a married couple disagrees on something, but one gives in out of love for the other. 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Here in the USA, we cherish our freedoms.  In grammar school, I was taught that I had as much freedom as possible, until it affects the freedom of others.  Per Paul’s teaching, might there be times when we should consider sacrificing some of our freedom out of love for our neighbor?

 

MARK 1:21-28

THE BACKGROUND

Jesus has called his first disciples, and has begun his teaching/preaching ministry.  He begins his preaching within the Jewish congregation, in the synagogues.

THE DETAIL

  • Jesus enters a synagogue in Capernaum, and teaches “having authority”. People are astounded. (vv. 21-22)
  • A man with an unclean spirit appears.  The spirits speak against Jesus, but in the process, they proclaim him to be “the Holy One of God”.  (vv. 23-24)
  • Jesus casts the demons out of the man, simply with his words.  (vv. 25-26)
  • Those who witness this are astounded.  They proclaim him to teach “with authority”.  They spread the news.

THE TAKEAWAY

As we read through the Gospels, one question is posed repeatedly—“Who is this Jesus of Nazareth?”  It is a question that many at the time were asking.  After all, Jesus was not a priest or a scribe, he was the son of a carpenter.  On the surface, he did not appear to have any qualifications for what he was doing. The miracles were one way that Jesus used to demonstrate his authority.  By providing clear authoritative preaching and demonstrating his power over the forces of evil, Jesus gets their attention.  In the process, his authority is proclaimed from the most unusual of sources; in this case, the unclean spirit proclaims him to be “the Holy One of God”.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Who do you believe Jesus is?  Just a carpenter’s son, or something more?

For January 24, 2021

JONAH 3:1-5, 10

THE BACKGROUND

The story of Jonah and the whale is my best friend Rob’s favorite Old Testament story.  It is such a wild and outlandish story.  Weird stuff happens all through this four chapter book of the bible.  I encourage you to read it.  It is a short tale (a fish tail?)  But I wonder if my buddy Rob understands the God Lesson.  Without that, it’s just another fish story, about the big one that got away.

It helps to know that at the time this story was told, the people of Israel kept their religion to themselves.  They were not spreading the word.  To the contrary, they hated their neighbors, and shunned contact with the outside world.  They hated the Ninevites.  Nineveh was the capital of Assyria, one of their long-time arch enemies.  Plus, the Assyrians did not worship the Lord God Yahweh; they worshipped false gods.  In our story, God tells Jonah to preach repentance to the people of Nineveh. Jonah did not take kindly to the order. He runs away in the opposite direction.

Most theologians consider this book to be a satirical fable.  Jonah personifies the attitudes of Israel, but God has other plans.  More on that in The Takeaway.  The writer of this book uses blistering satire to make his point. It is a fable because of the involvement of the large fish, especially so because of the fish’s paranormal behavior. If you feel strongly that this was a historical event and not a satirical fable, that’s OK, too.  Just be sure that you discover the God Lesson—what God wants you to learn from this fish tale.  If you want to discuss this further, I encourage you to leave a note below.

 

THE DETAIL

  • In verse 3:1, God repeats the command that he gave Jonah in 1:2.  In between these verses is the story of Jonah’s refusal, heading in the opposite direction, a storm at sea, he’s thrown overboard, a “large fish” (not a whale) swallowed Jonah, spitting him ashore right where he needed to go to walk to Nineveh! 
  • Jonah has a bad attitude.  He goes to this large city, but his heart is not in it.  He doesn’t even go to the city center to do his preaching.  I guess he figured a day’s walk was good enough. (vv. 3-4a)
  • When he stops, he gives the sorriest repentance speech that ever was, and leaves. (v. 4b)
  • The funny thing is that the people of Nineveh take this sorry prophecy very seriously.  Not only do the people and king fast & put on sackcloth as signs of their repentance, but they put sackcloth on the livestock, too! (vv.5-9)
  • The surprise of the story comes in verse 10.  God sees their repentance, and changes his mind about the destruction he was going to unleash.
  • If you read on, chapter 4 tells of Jonah’s anger at God’s mercy.  He is so angry that God has been merciful to these creeps that he just wants to die.

 

THE TAKEAWAY

This peculiar story is just as applicable to us today as it was for Israel back then.  We want God for ourselves, and are reluctant to share Him with others.  If we do share Him, we want them to come to God on our terms, by our rules.  There is no latitude for variation or difference.  God, on the other hand, has a heart that is much larger than ours. He loves everyone, and earnestly yearns for all to be in relationship with him.  He can tolerate our differences, if our heart is true.

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

I love my Old Lutheran liturgy, my Old German Lutheran hymns, all the candles and robes, and all the ceremony that goes with a traditional Lutheran worship service.  My definition of “Give Me that Old Time Religion” is quite a bit different than a Baptist’s definition, but I love it just the same.  Young people today listen to an entirely different style of music, with songs they hear on the Jesus Rock radio station.  There are electric guitars and drums!  But they do a fine job of worshiping our Lord. Can we be more tolerant of other Christians’ worship style and beliefs?  How should our evangelizing and welcoming mission be shaped to be more inclusive of other types of people?  Isn’t this the real work of the church?

 

1 CORINTHIANS 7:29-31

THE BACKGROUND

Chapter seven of Paul’s first letter to the church in Corinth is an interesting one.  He discusses various marital issues concerning the Christians there. Sometimes, he says his advice comes from the Lord.  Other times, he says it’s his opinion, and is not from the Lord.  Today’s verses are interesting to read and consider.  They come from the perspective that Paul and his followers expected Jesus to return at any moment.  Twenty centuries later, we know that this is not true.  We’ll get to that in a moment.  But first, let’s look at the verses.

 

THE DETAIL

  • In verse 29a, Paul tells us that “the appointed time has grown short”.  He expects Jesus’ return very soon.  The advice to follow is based on this statement.
  • Verses 29b-31a list some advice that seems very peculiar.  It is:
  • Those who have wives should be as though they have none.
  • Those who mourn should be as though there’s nothing to mourn.
  • Those who buy goods should be as though they have nothing.
  • Those who deal with the world should be as though they had no dealings with it.
  • Verse 31b gives the reason:  “For the present form of this world is passing away.”

 

THE TAKEAWAY

Well, OK. Paul got that one wrong.  Jesus’ return wasn’t just around the corner.  But before we throw the baby out with the bath water, let’s think about this a moment.  He expected Jesus to arrive at any moment.  Because of this, he recommended a shift in priorities—a sharpened focus on spiritual matters. 

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Maybe, Paul’s advice is a good wakeup call for us. Sure, it’s a bit extreme, but think about it.  What would you do, if you knew Jesus was returning next month?

I heard a story, but I can’t remember who it was. (If you know, please tell me!) 

A famous old Christian teacher was playing croquet with his pupils.  He asked his students what they would do, if they knew Jesus was coming next week.  One said that he would stop playing the game, and make peace with his brother.  Another said they would go immediately and settle an outstanding debt.  Yet another said they would help the poor know Jesus.  They then asked the teacher what he would do.  The teacher said that he would continue playing the game.  What was the teacher’s point?  Was he complacent?  Or did he feel that his students should have already done the things they said they were going to do.  We should already have helped the poor, payed our debts, and made peace with our brother. Like the teacher, we could then simply enjoy the game, and wait for Jesus arrival.

 

MARK 1:14-20

THE BACKGROUND

Mark’s gospel jumps right to John the baptizer. No manger scenes or shepherds in the fields.  Inside of 13 verses, John preaches, and baptizes Jesus.  By verse 14, he is already arrested by Herod.  Now that John’s mission is complete, Jesus begins his. 

Today’s lesson is similar to last week’s lesson—the calling of Jesus’ first disciples.  There are slight differences, but that’s to be expected. Each gospel writer saw things through their own “lens”.  Plus, they didn’t write this stuff down right away.  They wrote it down decades later.  There are bound to be differences. 

 

THE DETAIL

  • Once John’s work is through, Jesus proclaims that “the kingdom of God has come near”.  After all, God Incarnate is walking on the earth.  He is calling the people to come, listen, repent, and believe. (vv. 14-15)
  • In this account, Jesus is walking along the lakeshore, when he sees Simon and Andrew.  He calls them to follow him, and they will fish for people (instead of fish).  (vv. 16-17)
  • They drop everything, and immediately follow him. (v. 18)
  • Jesus, Simon, and Andrew are still in the fishing village of Bethsaida.  (It is not mentioned here.  We know this from last week’s lesson, John 1:44.)  Immediately, Jesus spots James and John, the sons of Zebedee. They leave their father with the hired help, and follow Jesus and the others.  (vv. 19-20)

 

THE TAKEAWAY

  • There is a sense of urgency in Mark’s writing.  Things happen immediately.  There is no “I’ll be along, as soon as I…”  His disciples drop everything and follow him.  Would we do the same?
  • Jesus calls us all to come, listen, repent, and believe.  The kingdom of God has come near.  It is here now, at least in part.  Jesus dwells in our hearts, and we are his disciples.  This is the kingdom, at least until he returns.

 

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